Sunday, 28 February 2010

Sweet William ~ Dianthus barbatus

Pictured above is my cat, Mrs. Woman. She LOVES Sweet William and guards it well.

Organic, heirloom and open-pollinated, a lovely cottage garden addition with many mixed colours, as you can see in the picture.
Sweet William is very Fragrant, grows from 8" - 14" tall, and is hardy to Zone 3, USDA.
It's often considered a self seeding perennial that is treated as a biennial and is a wonderful addition to any garden since all pollinators love them!
Available for sale here.
A Bit About Dianthus:

Dianthus are an old fashioned flower dating back 2000 years ago. They include pinks, carnations and Sweet William, among others.
You'll find annuals, biennials and perennials in varied heights and characteristics. Some dianthus are hardy all the way to Zone 3, including mine.
These wonderful little plants are survivors with a few quirky little traits.

The carnations we buy from florists are a large hybrid variety grown specially for commercial use. All dianthus are charming and add an old fashioned touch to the garden.

Culture Notes:

Sweet William should not be mulched or over watered. They need plenty of air circulation, and do not like soil or mulch touching the stems and foliage.

Sweet William requires at least 4-5 hours of sun per day, fertile, and well drained soil. When preparing the soil for dianthus, you might add a little lime to sweeten the soil.
Dianthus can be grown in container as well. Add a little grit, such as sand, to a standard potting mix for containers. "Sow" easy to grow!
Happy Gardening!
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Thursday, 25 February 2010

Container Gardening


Container Gardening


Garden enthusiast’s who lack space for gardening aspirations shouldn't fret, because North America’s favourite pastime is not necessarily out of range for them.

Smaller spaces, balconies, decks, and even windowsills, will accept a container garden. This can bring great pleasure and allow even apartment dwellers to have a little piece of paradise.
Choice of containers is limited only by your imagination, dwelling space, and the size of your wallet.

Clay pots, wooden barrels, hanging baskets, and urns, are all excellent examples.
Just imagine, all this without the aggravation of maintaining a lawn or weeding flowerbeds!
Personally, I am happy to mow the lawn and weed the garden, but this mean's that I may be an exception to the rule!



As with conventional gardening, containers require suitable preparation. Space, light, access to water, and weather, must be taken into account.
Restricted root space may put added constraints on your plant preferences since some are prolific in producing these over the course of a growing season.

Containers may have to be stored in a protected area to keep from freezing, and tender plants may not over-winter due to exposure of colder temperatures and wind.
Knowing your hardiness zone will help identify suitable plants for the new oasis.


You can plant bulbs, seeds, annuals, perennials, or even herbs & veggies in your containers. Just think of the fresh basil and tomatoes that can be grown in a very small space!
Something I do in my front yard, where I have two large wooden containers is to layer bulbs beneath other plants. This offers year-round interest, and I experiment with different plant combinations. This is half the fun, and it's a strategy will helps me get the most show from my containers.




Consider planting bulbs for spring blossoms, veggies for food, herbs for scent, and hardy mums for fall to winter flowers. Evergreen boughs can be rammed into the soil with dogwood branches before the frost hardens the soil, which can be left in the containers all winter for a festive look. Nearly any plant can be grown in a container, (size being the main limitation), so get out and experiment!

Potting soil works better than gardening soil, which is too heavy for most containers, and fertilizing is require more often than in a standard garden because annuals and vegetables diminish the nutrients rather quickly. Drainage is also a consideration.
I have used Styrofoam peanuts for drainage, which is great because it keeps them out of our landfill sites.


Not sure what to plant in your containers or how to attend to them? There are ample resources available. Books, magazines, websites, and local garden centres are all great places to start, and volunteering at a local garden club is another way to meet garden enthusiasts who are always happy to share their knowledge!

Happily, container gardening is rather inexpensive. There are initial expenses with containers, soil, and a periodic investment in plants, but with such ranges in size and material, there is something available for every budget and taste.

While Winter is still here, look at websites and magazines to get ideas, then when the season is in swing, you can start experimenting and experience the pleasure developing your container garden!

Thursday, 18 February 2010

Wall Flower Studio - Seed Catalogue!



* None of the seeds offered are genetically engineered.
* Selection of gifts from the garden: lavender buds, sachets, kindling bundles, plantable paper, and seed balls.
* A variety of seasonal fresh potted herbs, cut flowers, and more!
*Quality Seeds at low prices!
* Fast shipping across North America!
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Visit my Etsy site for all available online products!





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Wednesday, 3 February 2010

Seedy Saturday - 2010 - (On a Sunday!)


Wall Flower Studio is pleased to announce we will once again be participating at this year's Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday!), in Toronto.
People will be able to purchase organically grown products directly from us.
as well as organically grown lavender in sachets.
I'm really looking so forward to meeting other like minded gardeners
and flower/veggie/plant enthusiasts!
Please click the link below, or the picture above, for more information
regarding the date, time and location.

At Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday, 2010) you'll also witness amazing demo's, talks, and workshops relating to gardening, sustainability, & growing food. It's wonderful and it helps educate people about the need to save our own seeds and grow our own food. Let's not forget the kids. Lots for them in the "Kid Zone" as well!

This year the focus is on native gardening. The North American Native Plants Society, (NANPS) will be there, educating the public about the importance of native plants and the important role they play in our gardens. We should all be planting natives of some sort, especially since our pollinators depend on them, and since they are in decline,
it's more crucial than ever that we do this....

I just want to offer kudo's to all the people involved in this event. The ones who make it happen! Being an organic gardener and seed seller, as well an ecologically thinking person, I'm really looking forward to being a part of this year's Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday!).
It's all happening on Sunday, February 21st, 2010 - 12:30 pm until 6:00 pm
All this is thanks to: ~ Toronto Community Garden Network, ~The Stop, and
Hope to see you there!